How to Beat The Summertime Blues

June 18, 2017

Summer in Denver is an interesting time. We come out of our winter hibernation, and suddenly, the whole city comes alive. It seems like everyone is laughing with friends on a patio, hiking in the mountains, and enjoying the carefree moments that we associate with summer. 

 

However, many of you may feel like you’re missing out on the party. You might feel like you’re unmotivated, lacking energy, anxious, or just feeling down. You realize you’ve got the summertime blues, and you’re left wondering why all of the sunshine and rainbows that everyone else is enjoying have left you surrounded by a dark cloud. 

If you’re feeling the summertime blues, here are a few tips to help you raise your spirits.

 

Get present. 

 

When we focus our thinking on negative events in the past or on fear of the future, we are creating a sense of anxiety and suffering for ourselves over two things we have absolutely no control over: the past and the future. 

 

While its easy to get caught up in this cycle of thinking, it can create a lot of stress. The key to breaking this pattern is to have awareness that you’re doing it, and then to focus on the present. Sometimes the present is easy to focus on, like when we are doing something we enjoy. Sometimes it requires energy, especially when we are hurting. It could be as simple as focusing on our breath, or the sunshine upon our skin, or a song we are listening to. Building the muscle within to focus on the present moment can work wonders. 

 

Detox the body.

 

We also have a tendency to drink more alcohol or to overindulge in barbecues, parties, and food that isn’t supporting our physical health. Summer can indeed take a toll on our physical bodies, which has a close connection with how we feel mentally and emotionally. Research is building a strong case for the connection between our gut health and our mental and emotional health.

 

Learning ways to clean up your diet can create a natural boost to your mood and decrease anxiety. If you’re interested in learning more about the link between nutrition and your mental health, click here to explore our Mind Full Body nutritional healing program.

 

Beware of FOMO.

 

Do you feel more lonely in the summer?  In the winter, since people are indoors, we don’t get the constant reminders of everyone around us that is having fun with friends. When you drive by a park or a restaurant with a lively patio, you may experience the dreaded FOMO…fear of missing out. If you feel isolated, or just happen to have a lone Friday night, it can cause increased loneliness, anxiety, or feelings of isolation. 

 

FOMO can be a powerful ingredient in fueling depression and anxiety. We simply see more people doing more things in the summer, such as picnicking in the park, Red Rocks concerts, taking exotic vacations and posting pictures on social media, and enjoying endless happy hours on patios. Its easy to feel left out if your calendar isn’t filled with social activities.

 

If you feel disconnected or lonely, try joining a Meetup group to meet some new people or do something you enjoy. Or, invite a friend to do something, instead of waiting for an invitation. 

If you’re more of an introvert, and need your alone time, then embrace it. Do what fills you up, and don’t worry about what everyone else is doing. You are the only person you have to please. 

 

Enjoy the sunshine.

 

The summer heat may tempt you to close up the blinds and stay hidden in a dark, cool house. However, sunshine is a natural mood booster, as it increases Vitamin D, which is important for our moods and immune systems. Also, exposing yourself to sunshine earlier in the morning, will help your body stop releasing melatonin, which makes you sleep at night. 

 

The best strategy is to get into a routine of taking an early morning walk, before the summer heat sets in. You’ll get your sunlight exposure, exercise, and stick to a routine which can all contribute to a happier mood. 

 

The summertime blues are common. Sometimes with a few strategies like this you can uplift your spirits.  If you’re really struggling, or just need a tune up, schedule a session here.  

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